It’s A No-Money Day by Kate Milner

Wow. This book has completely floored me. It’s an emotional, sensitive, heart-rending but, in its own way, beautiful book. Of course, it’s always difficult to use a word like ‘beautiful’ about a book that is...

A Child of the Jago by Arthur Morrison

First published in 1896, A Child of the Jago is arguably the most significant novel from a school of writing that’s often referred to as ‘slum literature’. Morrison was a journalist and writer who himself came...

How Change Happens by Duncan Green

Between a rock star and a hard place, learn to dance with complexity. Sorry Sir Bob, but development rarely has a straight forward problem, solution and villain. This mantra runs through Duncan Greene’s...

Crippled: Austerity and the demonization of disabled people by Frances Ryan

How refreshing. Frances Ryan pulls no punches and the result is a book that puts to shame the mealy-mouthed popular public and political discourse about equality, diversity and the ‘inspirational bravery’ of...

The Phonics Screening Check 2012-2017: An independent enquiry into the views of Head Teachers, teachers and parents by Margaret M. Clark OBE

This research has been published on the Newman University website. The author has provided the following introduction to the report “Should synthetic phonics remain mandated as the only way to teach all...

It’s A No-Money Day by Kate Milner

Wow. This book has completely floored me. It’s an emotional, sensitive, heart-rending but, in its own way, beautiful book. Of course, it’s always difficult to use a word like ‘beautiful’ about a book that is about the grinding, terrible nature of...

A Child of the Jago by Arthur Morrison

First published in 1896, A Child of the Jago is arguably the most significant novel from a school of writing that’s often referred to as ‘slum literature’. Morrison was a journalist and writer who himself came from a working class background and who...

How Change Happens by Duncan Green

Between a rock star and a hard place, learn to dance with complexity. Sorry Sir Bob, but development rarely has a straight forward problem, solution and villain. This mantra runs through Duncan Greene’s excellent new book “How Change Happens”...